How and why cultural groups tend to see themselves in terms of us versus them

The question is whether it is done in friendly ways that accelerate improvement and performance. Or is it a negative force that fosters uncertainty and lack of trust? There is the bond of a shared goal.

How and why cultural groups tend to see themselves in terms of us versus them

This section of the Essential Tool explores the role of culture in the transition process. Culture refers to the patterns of values and learned behaviors that are shared and transmitted from generation to generation by the members of a social group.

Values in this broad sense are assumed to guide how people live their lives, including their moral judgments, goals, and behaviors. Exploring and understanding the values of youth and their families is therefore an important key for planning and providing transition services and supports, and in achieving better outcomes.

It is possible, however, to identify an area of contrast between the values of American mainstream culture and the values characteristic of many other cultures Niles, An example using self-determination will illustrate the importance of understanding and addressing the contrast between individualistic and collectivistic values.

It is important to realize that values, like any human characteristic, fall along a continuum. For example, a culture oriented to individualism might highly value being able to work independently, while a culture oriented to collectivism might highly value being able to work as part of a group.

Social Identity Theory | Simply Psychology

However, the first culture almost certainly also values being able to work as part of a group, and the second culture also values being able to work independently. The difference is in the relative importance that each culture places on these contrasting values.

The concept of a continuum also applies to individuals within a culture. Most members of a collectivistic culture will hold values at the collectivistic end of the continuum, although each will be at a different spot on the continuum, and some will even be at the individualistic end.

Where they are on the continuum of values depends on such factors as how closely they identify with traditional culture, their level of education, and the ethnic mix of their community. This variability among people again illustrates the need for individualization in transition services and supports Atkins, As Trumbull et al.

Alternative Views of People as Independent or Interdependent Individualism and collectivism are subsets of broad worldviews, which have been called, respectively, atomism and holism Shore, Atomism is prominent in the western hemisphere and refers to the tendency to view things in terms of their component parts.

This orientation has supported advances such as scientific discoveries about how the physical world works and the development of assembly line manufacturing.

How and why cultural groups tend to see themselves in terms of us versus them

Holism is characteristic of most CLD cultures and refers to the tendency to view all aspects of life as interconnected. The primary individualistic view is that there are sharp boundaries between people, with each person being a complete unit.

In other words, people are considered to be independent. They are generally also thought to have rights and responsibilities that are more or less the same.

By contrast, the primary collectivistic view is that people are not separate units, but rather are part and parcel of a larger group i. In other words, people are interdependent.

Introduction

The person is instead a locus of shared biographies:Start studying Psych Ch. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools.

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How and why cultural groups tend to see themselves in terms of us versus them

their increasing accuracy in understanding themselves permits them to see themselves fully; it's what they do with these perceptions that leads them to develop a sense of their self-esteem coequal cultural groups.

But the truth is, when we actually confront the difficult task of finding common ground between us and them, we tend to throw in the towel rather quickly.

The Cultural Context CHAPTER OBJECTIVES After reading this chapter, you should be able to The United States, for example, is considered an individualistic culture, yet groups and independence of groups.

Individualists tend to see themselves as unique from others. 7 Harry Triandis, from the University of Illinois, is well known for his. Start studying Psych Ch. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools.

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Social Identity Theory Outline

Create. their increasing accuracy in understanding themselves permits them to see themselves fully; it's what they do with these perceptions that leads them to develop a sense of their self-esteem coequal cultural groups.

Ch 5 quiz. STUDY. PLAY. there are cultural differences in how people view themselves. Describe, using an example, how people from collectivist cultures tend to view themselves, and how people from individualist cultures tend to view themselves.

How to Avoid "Us" vs. "Them" Thinking in Your Team | HuffPost

For example, they see themselves in terms of their relationships, and make . In the US, what we generally mean by different cultures are foreign cultures and sub-cultures within our larger US community. An example of a foreign culture, might be a person coming from China to the United States.

Social Identity Theory | Simply Psychology